Edo-Tokyo Open Air Museum

Time travel through historical buildings

โดย Lucio Maurizi   

The Edo-Tokyo Open Air Architectural Museum is not one of the most accessible attractions in Tokyo, especially when compared to more popular temples, parks, and neighborhoods.

Nevertheless it's a must visit for all those interested in Japanese architecture, and Japanese history and culture.

Even if you're not a fan of buildings and houses, being able to see and walk into shops and mansions that are as old as 300 years is a unique experience that can make you feel as if you're traveling in time while exploring an aspect of Japan that you won't find anywhere else in the Greater Tokyo Area.

The buildings range from traditional Japanese-style to western structures, the latter of which were introduced to Japan in the early 20th century. Visitors can appreciate both the exterior and interior views of these buildings.

All buildings are original and have been relocated into the museum (although many of them have undergone lesser or larger degrees of restoration).

The museum sits in the large and beautiful Koganei Park that is particularly worth visiting in the spring for the lush cherry blossoms and in the fall for the beautiful momiji (maple trees).

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The open air museum is located in the western part of Koganei Park, Koganei City, 25 minutes west of Tokyo's Shinjuku Station by train.

From Shinjuku, take either the Seibu Shinjuku Line to Hana-Koganei Station, or the JR Chuo Line to Musashi-Koganei Station. From either station, the park is a 5-10 minute ride or 15-30 minute walk.

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Lucio Maurizi

Lucio Maurizi @lucio.maurizi

Hello! I'm Italian, I have lived in the United States for almost 10 years and now I'm in Japan, Kyoto and I've been for over 2 years. I work as a freelance writer and recently started trying my hand as contributor for Japan based magazines, webzines and newspapers. I'm trying to combine my passion for Japan with my training as a writer, hoping to entertain, inform, and challenge readers and fellow writers.